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Article
Inequalities in the Overlooked Associations in Urban Educational Collaborations
The Urban Review: A Quarterly Journal of Issues and Ideas in Public Education (2001)
  • Kelly Ann Kolodny
Abstract
This study examines the relationships between families and staff from community agencies and organizations in a poverty level urban neighborhood in the Northeast. A central concern of this study is to address how the existing relationships between these groups may affect urban educational restructuring efforts that encourage collaborations of families, schools, and community institutions to support the social and academic development of children. If community agencies and organizations are to engage in successful collaborations with inner city schools, it is critical that they be able to work with the children and families affiliated with these institutions. Findings from this study suggest that though these educational collaborations may yield support for children and their families, there are reasons to proceed cautiously which stem from the existing relationships between families and staff from community agencies and organizations. The relationships between these groups often rest on inherent inequalities. These inequalities stem from inequitable structural conditions which place a large population of urban residents at an economic disadvantage and compel them to seek services. Structural conditions, accompanied by public policies embedded in assumptions regarding which family members are deserving of support, subsequently has influenced who receives services. Mothers and their children typically are recipients of services. The inequalities that are inherent to these relationships, likewise, carry through to the roles that families and staff assume with each other in their daily associations.
Keywords
  • educational collaborations,
  • School Community Relationship,
  • urban schools,
  • poverty,
  • equal education
Disciplines
Publication Date
June, 2001
DOI
10.1023/A:1010345308190
Citation Information
Kolodny, K.A. The Urban Review (2001) 33: 151. doi:10.1023/A:1010345308190