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Article
The changing publication practices in academia: inherent uses and issues in open access and online publishing and the rise of fraudulent publications
The Journal of Electronic Publishing (2015)
  • Keith McNaught, The University of Notre Dame Australia
Abstract
Open access and online publishing present significant changes to the Australian higher education sector in a climate demanding increasing research outputs from academic staff. Today’s researchers struggle to discern credible journals from a new wave of ‘low credibility,’ counterfeit, and predatory journals. A New York Times article on the issue resulted in hundreds of anonymous posts, having a whistleblower effect. An analysis of reader posts, examined in this paper, demonstrated that fear and cynicism were dominant, and that unscrupulous publishing practices were often rewarded. A lack of quality control measures to assist researchers to choose reputable journals and avoid fraudulent ones is becoming evident as universities’ funding and workforce development become increasingly dependent on research outputs. Online publishing is also redefining traditional notions of academic prestige. Adapting to the twenty-first century online publishing landscape requires the higher education sector to meet these challenges with a combination of academic rigour and innovative tools that support researchers, so as to maintain quality and integrity within changing academic publishing practice.
Disciplines
Publication Date
2015
DOI
http://dx.doi.org/10.3998/3336451.0018.308
Citation Information
Keith McNaught. "The changing publication practices in academia: inherent uses and issues in open access and online publishing and the rise of fraudulent publications" The Journal of Electronic Publishing Vol. 18 Iss. 3 (2015)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/keith-mcnaught/1/