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Urinary sodium excretion, dietary sources of sodium intake and knowledge and practices around salt use in a group of healthy Australian women
Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)
  • Karen E Charlton, University of Wollongong
  • Heather Yeatman, University of Wollongong
  • Fiona Houweling, University of Wollongong
  • Sophie Guenon, University of Wollongong
RIS ID
33091
Publication Date
1-1-2010
Publication Details

Charlton, K. E., Yeatman, H., Houweling, F. & Guenon, S. (2010). Urinary sodium excretion, dietary sources of sodium intake and knowledge and practices around salt use in a group of healthy Australian women. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 34 (4), 356-363.

Abstract
Objective: Strategies that aim to facilitate reduction of the salt content of foods in Australia are hampered by sparse and outdated data on habitual salt intakes. This study assessed habitual sodium intake through urinary excretion analyses, and identified food sources of dietary sodium, as well as knowledge and practices related to salt use in healthy women. Methods: Cross-sectional, convenient sample of 76 women aged 20 to 55 years, Wollongong, NSW. Data included a 24 hour urine sample, three-day food diary and a self-administered questionnaire. Results: Mean Na excretion equated to a NaCl (salt) intake of 6.41 (SD=2.61) g/day; 43% had values /day. Food groups contributing to dietary sodium were: bread and cereals (27%); dressings/sauces (20%); meat/egg-based dishes (18%); snacks/desserts/extras (11%); and milk and dairy products (11%). Approximately half the sample reported using salt in cooking or at the table. Dietary practices reflected a high awareness of salt-related health issues and a good knowledge of food sources of sodium. Conclusion: These findings from a sample of healthy women in the Illawarra indicate that dietary sodium intakes are lower in this group than previously reported in Australia. However, personal food choices and high levels of awareness of the salt reduction messages are not enough to achieve more stringent dietary targets of foods.
Citation Information
Karen E Charlton, Heather Yeatman, Fiona Houweling and Sophie Guenon. "Urinary sodium excretion, dietary sources of sodium intake and knowledge and practices around salt use in a group of healthy Australian women" (2010) p. 356 - 363
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/kcharlton/26/