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Article
Introduction effort, climate matching and species traits as predictors of global establishment success in non-native reptiles
Diversity and Distributions
  • Peter J Mahoney, Utah State University
  • Karen H Beard, Utah State University
  • Andrew M. Durso, Utah State University
  • Aimee G. Tallian, Utah State University
  • A. Lexine Long, Utah State University
  • Ryan J. Kindermann, Utah State University
  • Nicole E. Nolan, Utah State University
  • Daniel Kinka, Utah State University
  • Harrison E. Mohn, Utah State University
Document Type
Article
Publisher
Blackwell Publishing Ltd
Publication Date
1-1-2015
DOI
10.1111/ddi.12240
Abstract
Non-native reptiles are often detrimental to native communities and ecosystems and can be extremely difficult to manage once established. Thus, there is considerable interest in predicting the likelihood of establishment of nonnative reptiles. We assessed three hypotheses describing possible factors contributing to the successful establishment of introduced reptiles in an effort to better identify potential invaders.
Citation Information
Peter J Mahoney, Karen H Beard, Andrew M. Durso, Aimee G. Tallian, et al.. "Introduction effort, climate matching and species traits as predictors of global establishment success in non-native reptiles" Diversity and Distributions Vol. 21 Iss. 1 (2015) p. 64 - 74
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/karenh_beard/185/