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Introduction effort, climate matching and species traits as predictors of global establishment success in non-native reptiles
Diversity and Distributions (2015)
  • Peter J Mahoney
  • Karen H Beard, Utah State University
  • Andrew M Durso
  • Aimee G Tallian
  • A. Lexine Long
  • Ryan J Kindermann
  • Nicole E Nolan
  • Daniel Kinka
  • Harrison E Mohn
Abstract
We found that location-level factors were most important in describing reptile establishment success, followed by event- and species-level factors, respectively. This pattern matches closely with what others have found in a variety of vertebrate taxa. However, the importance of species traits may be underestimated considering the insufficient knowledge of reptile life history within introduced ranges. Importantly, individual variables from all three hypotheses contributed to global reptile establishment. Managers should be especially cognizant of small herbivorous and fecund reptiles that are frequently introduced into areas with a strong climate match to their native range. Further, parthenogenesis greatly facilitated establishment, indicating that obligate parthenogenetic species may become ubiquitous through modern globalized trade.
Disciplines
Publication Date
2015
Publisher Statement
DOI: 10.1111/ddi.12240
Citation Information
Peter J Mahoney, Karen H Beard, Andrew M Durso, Aimee G Tallian, et al.. "Introduction effort, climate matching and species traits as predictors of global establishment success in non-native reptiles" Diversity and Distributions Vol. 21 Iss. 1 (2015)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/karenh_beard/136/