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A long-term rusty crayfish (Orconectes rusticus) invasion: dispersal patterns and community change in a north temperate lake.
Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences (2004)
  • Karen Wilson, University of Southern Maine
  • J. Magnuson
  • D. Lodge
  • A. Hill
  • T. Kratz
  • W. Perry
  • T. Willis
Abstract
Rusty crayfish (Orconectes rusticus) were first observed in Trout Lake, Wisconsin, in 1979 and took 19 years to completely disperse around the littoral zone, advancing at an average rate of 0.68 km·year–1. With the invasion of rusty crayfish, we found that fishes that share prey taxa with crayfish declined in numbers over time, but piscivorous fish species did not change in abundance. Snails declined from >10 000 to <5 snails·m–2 in one of the first invaded areas. Mean abundance of Odonata, Amphipoda, and Trichoptera decreased significantly lake-wide. Resident crayfish species nearly disappeared, although total crayfish abundance, driven by high abundances of rusty crayfish, continued to rise. Submerged macrophyte species richness declined by as much as 80% at some locations.
Publication Date
2004
Citation Information
Karen Wilson, J. Magnuson, D. Lodge, A. Hill, et al.. "A long-term rusty crayfish (Orconectes rusticus) invasion: dispersal patterns and community change in a north temperate lake." Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences Vol. 61 Iss. 11 (2004)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/karen_wilson/10/