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Contribution to Book
The House that "Equality" Built: The Asian American Movement and the Legacy of Community Action
The War on Poverty: A New Grassroots History, 1964-1980 (2011)
  • Karen M Tani, Berkeley Law
Abstract

"President Lyndon Baines Johnson liked to quote the prophet Isaiah. 'Come, let us reason together,' Johnson sometimes said (assuming the voice of God) as he prepared to exercise his famous powers of persuasion. But Johnson was no literalist. Jesus told his disciples that the poor would be 'with you always.' Johnson and the other architects of the Great Society disagreed. Convinced that privation had no place in modern America, they confidently launched the concatenation of federal initiatives known as the War on Poverty. That war is now over; the poor, as predicted, remain. Yet the battle mattered--not because it was effective or ineffective (a question that scholars, activists, and policymakers continue to debate) but because of what it did on the ground and apart from its creators' intentions. The War on Poverty fundamentally altered how government largesse reaches the poor as well as who enjoys the power that comes from channeling state beneficence. One of the locations in which that imprint is clearest is New York City's Chinatown."--p.411

Disciplines
Publication Date
2011
Editor
Annelise Orleck & Lisa Gayle Hazirjian, eds.
Publisher
University of Georgia Press
ISBN
9780820341842
Citation Information
Karen M Tani. "The House that "Equality" Built: The Asian American Movement and the Legacy of Community Action" AthensThe War on Poverty: A New Grassroots History, 1964-1980 (2011)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/karen_tani/5/