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Article
Using Pedometers as an Evidenc-based Strategy to Increase the daily Steps of Older Adults with Chronic Illness: From Research to Practice.
Home Healthcare Nurse (2006)
  • B. C. Farmer, University of Southern Maine
  • Karen A Croteau, University of Southern Maine
  • Nancy R. Richeson, University of Southern Maine
  • David D. Jones, University of Southern Maine
Abstract
A. J., a 75-year-old widow living independently in her own downtown apartment, appears very discouraged when the home health clinician encourages her to get more "exercise." A.J. knows that more "exercise" would benefit her diabetes, arthritis, and now coronary artery disease, but she exclaims that she does not know where to start. In addition, she admits that she has always "hated" exercise. "I am a hopeless case," she sighs and begins to cry. The clinician shares his patient's frustration and thinks that there must be a better way to reach older adults with chronic illness who need to increase their physical activity levels. What can he do to help his older client increase her levels of physical activity?
Keywords
  • Pedometers. Physical Activity,
  • Health and Wellness
Publication Date
July, 2006
Publisher Statement
Copyright: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins 2006
Citation Information
B. C. Farmer, Karen A Croteau, Nancy R. Richeson and David D. Jones. "Using Pedometers as an Evidenc-based Strategy to Increase the daily Steps of Older Adults with Chronic Illness: From Research to Practice." Home Healthcare Nurse Vol. 24 Iss. 7 (2006)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/karen_croteau/10/