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Article
Objective and subjective benefits of a community-based, older adult multi-component exercise programme
Journal of Primary Health Care
  • Justin Keogh, Bond University
  • John Rice, Auckland University of Technology
  • Denise Taylor, Auckland University of Technology
  • Andrew Kilding, Auckland University of Technology
Date of this Version
6-1-2014
Document Type
Journal Article
Publication Details

Citation only

Keogh, J. W., Rice, J., Taylor, D., & Kilding, A. (2014). Objective and subjective benefits of a community-based, older adult multi-component exercise programme. Journal of Primary Health Care, 6(2), 114–122.

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© Copyright, Journal of Primary Health Care , 2014

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons 4.0 License

Abstract

Most exercise studies for older adults have been university- or hospital-based. Little is known about the benefits and factors influencing long-term participation in community-based exercise programmes, especially in New Zealand. AIM: To quantify the objective benefits, participant perceptions and retention rates of a New Zealand community-based exercise programme for adults (60 years or older). METHODS: Study 1 involved assessing the benefits of 12 weeks' training on a convenience sample of 62 older adults commencing the never2old Active Ageing programme. Study 2 assessed the perceptions of 150 current participants on a variety of programme components that could act as barriers or facilitators to continued engagement. Study 3 assessed the retention rates of 264 participants in the programme over a two-year period. RESULTS: Significant improvements in many physical functional scores were observed in Study 1 (5-30 percentile points; p

Citation Information
Justin Keogh, John Rice, Denise Taylor and Andrew Kilding. "Objective and subjective benefits of a community-based, older adult multi-component exercise programme" Journal of Primary Health Care (2014) ISSN: 1172-6164
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/justin_keogh/54/