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Contribution to Book
Women, kin-keeping and the inscription of gender in mediated communication environments.
ECU Publications 2011
  • Julie Dare, Edith Cowan University
Publication Date
1-1-2011
Document Type
Book Chapter
Publisher
McFarland & Company, Inc
Editor(s)
M. Ames & S.H. Burcon
Faculty
Faculty of Computing, Health and Science
School
School of Exercise and Health Sciences / Population Health Research Group
RAS ID
12230
Comments
This chapter was originally published as: Dare, J. S. (2011). Women, kin-keeping and the inscription of gender in mediated communication environments. In M. Ames & S.H. Burcon (Eds.). Women and language: Essays on gendered communication across media (pp. 185-198). Location: McFarland & Company, Inc.
Abstract
The notion of the Internet as a transformative communications platform, through which concepts such as embodiment, gender, and identity can be transcended, deconstructed, or subverted, represents an enduring theme in communications literature over the last two decades.1 Underpinning early analyses was the premise that new opportunities presented by the Internet were driving innovative communication and behavioral practices. For example, the ability to interact anonymously opened the door for identity play and gender swapping, the implications of which, as Nancy Baym suggests, were "theoretically intoxicating"
Citation Information
Julie Dare. "Women, kin-keeping and the inscription of gender in mediated communication environments." (2011)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/julie_dare/2/