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Presentation
Between ancient Roman law and modern law and economics, introducing the legal system for 21st-century Latin America and the Caribbean
Northwestern University School of Law (2010)
  • Juan Javier del Granado
Abstract
Within the civil-law world, law and economics is more likely to become dominant in Latin America than in Europe because the change-resisting hand of the old guard is less heavy and legal education has become increasingly competitive. The systematic and endemic weaknesses of large public universities in Latin America have opened the doors of academe to fast-growing competition from new private universities. Old-guard universities that are unable to mobilize resistance to new entrants, may be forced to retrench and retool in an effort to just survive. As a direct result of the region’s present state of underdevelopment, law schools in Latin America and the Caribbean are institutionally open to change. If the instrument of change wears local clothing, successful introduction becomes even more likely.
Disciplines
Publication Date
April 7, 2010
Citation Information
Juan Javier del Granado. "Between ancient Roman law and modern law and economics, introducing the legal system for 21st-century Latin America and the Caribbean" Northwestern University School of Law (2010)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/juan_javier_del_granado/55/