Skip to main content
Article
Is Wage Rate Dispersion a Good Index of Labor Market Integration? A Comment on Rothenberg
The Journal of Economic History (1989)
  • Joshua L. Rosenbloom, University of Kansas
Abstract
In a recent article in this JOURNAL, Winifred Rothenberg seeks to document the emergence of rural labor markets in late eighteenth and early nineteenth-century New England.' Examining a rich body of wage data which she has collected from the account books of farmers, Rothenberg traces first temporal variations in the dispersion of wages, and then the pattern of variation in nominal and real wage rates over more than one hundred years. These aggregative measures of the operation of the labor market do not begin to exhaust the potential of the data which Rothenberg has accumulated, however, and I look forward to further and more detailed examinations of the behavior of farm wages in antebellum New England. Since such research is likely to be directed by the interpretation placed on the broad trends documented in her article, I offer the following comments to suggest fruitful lines of research.
Publication Date
March, 1989
Citation Information
Joshua L. Rosenbloom. "Is Wage Rate Dispersion a Good Index of Labor Market Integration? A Comment on Rothenberg" The Journal of Economic History Vol. 49 Iss. 1 (1989)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/joshua_rosenbloom/6/