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Article
Occupational Differences in Labor Market Integration: The U.S. in 1890
The Journal of Economic History (1991)
  • Joshua L. Rosenbloom, University of Kansas
Abstract
When labor markets are subject to large demand or supply shocks, as was the case in the late nineteenth-century United States, geographic wage differentials may not be an accurate index of market integration. This article uses a conceptually more appealing measure—the elasticity of local labor supply—to compare the integration of urban labor markets for a variety of occupations in 1890. According to this measure, markets, for unskilled labor and skilled metal-working trades appear relatively well integrated in comparison to those for the skilled building trades.
Publication Date
June, 1991
Citation Information
Joshua L. Rosenbloom. "Occupational Differences in Labor Market Integration: The U.S. in 1890" The Journal of Economic History Vol. 51 Iss. 2 (1991)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/joshua_rosenbloom/21/