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Article
The Sources of Regional Variation in the Severity of the Great Depression: Evidence from U.S. Manufacturing, 1919-1937
The Journal of Economic History (1999)
  • Joshua L. Rosenbloom, University of Kansas
  • William A. Sundstrom, Santa Clara University
Abstract
The impact of the Great Depression was milder in the South Atlantic states, more severe in the Mountain states, and surprisingly uniform across other regions of the countly—despite large differences in industrial structere. Employing data on 20 manufacturing industries disaggregated by state, we analyze the relative contributions of industry mix and location to regional variations in economic performance. Industrial composition had a significant impact on employment growth, with regions that concentrated on durable goods or inputs to construction faring worse than others. Long-run trends also mattered, and explain much of the South Atlantic's more favorable performance.
Publication Date
September, 1999
Citation Information
Joshua L. Rosenbloom and William A. Sundstrom. "The Sources of Regional Variation in the Severity of the Great Depression: Evidence from U.S. Manufacturing, 1919-1937" The Journal of Economic History Vol. 59 Iss. 3 (1999)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/joshua_rosenbloom/17/