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Article
Labor Market Institutions and the Geographic Integration of Labor Markets in the Late Nineteenth-Century United States
The Journal of Economic History (1990)
  • Joshua L. Rosenbloom, University of Kansas
Abstract
The late nineteenth century is widely regarded as the era in which a national economy first emerged in the United States. The elaboration of national rail and telegraph networks in the decades after the Civil War lowered the cost and increased the speed of transportation and communication. While manufacturers in many industries consolidated national markets for their products, a variety of new financial intermediaries promoted increasing arbitrage in the market for capital. My dissertation examines the extent of labor market integration at this time.
Publication Date
June, 1990
Citation Information
Joshua L. Rosenbloom. "Labor Market Institutions and the Geographic Integration of Labor Markets in the Late Nineteenth-Century United States" The Journal of Economic History Vol. 50 Iss. 2 (1990)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/joshua_rosenbloom/15/