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Article
How Developing Countries can Adapt Current Bilateral Investment Treaties to Provide Benefits to Their Domestic Economies
Global Business Law Review (2010)
  • Joshua B Boone, Albany Law School
Abstract

The manuscript is entitled "How Developing Countries can Adapt Current Bilateral Investment Treaties to Provide Benefits to Their Domestic Economies."

This article is to be published in Global Business Law Review, a journal of the Cleveland-Marshall School of Law. Publication will occur in the Fall of 2010.

Bilateral Investment Treaties (hereafter referred to as "BITs") are treaties often signed between developed and developing countries, to help encourage Foreign Direct Investment (hereafter referred to as "FDI") capital to come into a developing country and stimulate their markets, economies and infrastructures.

This article attempts to show that a pseudo-interventionist approach to BIT provisions, coupled with the promotion of the recent changes made to the alternative dispute resolution mechanisms, can help developing countries entice FDI while actually promoting domestic markets and improving domestic economies.

Disciplines
Publication Date
Fall 2010
Citation Information
Joshua Boone, How Developing Countries can Adapt Current Bilateral Investment Treaties to Provide Benefits to Their Domestic Economies, publication pending Global Business Law Review (2010).