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Article
30-year trends in patient characteristics, treatment practices, and long-term outcomes of adults aged 35 to 54 years hospitalized with acute myocardial infarction
Meyers Primary Care Institute Publications and Presentations
  • Mayra Tisminetzky, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • David D. McManus, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Joel M. Gore, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Jorge L. Yarzebski, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Andrew H. Coles, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Darleen M. Lessard, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Robert J. Goldberg, University of Massachusetts Medical School
UMMS Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine; Meyers Primary Care Institute; Department of Quantitative Health Sciences; Department of Cell and Developmental Biology; Program in Gene Function and Expression
Date
4-1-2014
Document Type
Article
Medical Subject Headings
Adult; Female; Follow-Up Studies; *Forecasting; Hospital Mortality; *Hospitalization; Humans; Incidence; Male; Massachusetts; Middle Aged; Myocardial Infarction; Primary Prevention; Retrospective Studies; Risk Factors; Secondary Prevention; Time Factors; Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Much of our knowledge about the characteristics, clinical management, and postdischarge outcomes of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is derived from clinical studies in middle-aged and older subjects with little contemporary information available about the descriptive epidemiology of AMI in relatively young men and women. The objectives of our population-based study were to describe >3-decade-long trends in the clinical features, treatment practices, and long-term outcomes of young adults aged 35 to 54 years discharged from the hospital after AMI. The study population consisted of 2,142 residents of the Worcester (Massachusetts) metropolitan area who were hospitalized with AMI at all central Massachusetts medical centers during 16 annual periods from 1975 to 2007. Our primarily male study population had an average age of 47 years. Patients hospitalized during the most recent decade (1997 to 2007) under study were more likely to have a history of hypertension and heart failure than those hospitalized during earlier study years. Patients were less likely to have developed heart failure or stroke during their hospitalization in the most recent compared with the initial decade under study (heart failure 13.7% and stroke 0.7% vs 20.9% and 2.0%, respectively). One- and 2-year postdischarge death rates also decreased significantly between 1975 to 1986 (6.2% and 9.0%, respectively) and 1988 to 1995 (2.6% and 4.9%). These trends were concomitant with the increasing use of effective cardiac therapies and coronary interventions during hospitalization. The present results provide insights into the changing characteristics, management, and improving long-term outcomes of relatively young patients hospitalized with AMI.
Rights and Permissions
Citation: Am J Cardiol. 2014 Apr 1;113(7):1137-41. doi: 10.1016/j.amjcard.2013.12.020. Epub 2014 Jan 14. Link to article on publisher's site
Related Resources
Link to Article in PubMed
PubMed ID
24507173
Citation Information
Mayra Tisminetzky, David D. McManus, Joel M. Gore, Jorge L. Yarzebski, et al.. "30-year trends in patient characteristics, treatment practices, and long-term outcomes of adults aged 35 to 54 years hospitalized with acute myocardial infarction" Vol. 113 Iss. 7 (2014) ISSN: 0002-9149 (Linking)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/jorge_yarzebski/94/