Skip to main content
Article
Relation of Atrial Fibrillation in Acute Myocardial Infarction to In-Hospital Complications and Early Hospital Readmission
UMass Center for Clinical and Translational Science Supported Publications
  • Amartya Kundu, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Kevin O'Day, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Amir Y. Shaikh, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Darleen M. Lessard, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Jane S. Saczynski, Northeastern University
  • Jorge L. Yarzebski, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Chad E. Darling, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Ramses Thabet, St. Vincent Hospital
  • Mohammed W. Akhter, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Kevin C. Floyd, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Robert J. Goldberg, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • David D. McManus, University of Massachusetts Medical School
UMMS Affiliation
Department of Medicine; Department of Quantitative Health Sciences; Department of Emergency Medicine; Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine
Date
4-15-2016
Document Type
Article
Abstract
Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common complication of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and contributes to high rates of in-hospital adverse events. However, there are few contemporary studies examining rates of AF in the contemporary era of AMI or the impact of new-onset AF on key in-hospital and postdischarge outcomes. We examined trends in AF in 6,384 residents of Worcester, Massachusetts, who were hospitalized with confirmed AMI during 7 biennial periods between 1999 and 2011. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to examine associations between occurrence of AF and various in-hospital and postdischarge complications. The overall incidence of AF complicating AMI was 10.8%. Rates of new-onset AF increased from 1999 to 2003 (9.8% to 13.2%), and decreased thereafter. In multivariable adjusted models, patients developing new-onset AF after AMI were at a higher risk for in-hospital stroke (odds ratio [OR] 2.5, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.6 to 4.1), heart failure (OR 2.0, 95% CI 1.7 to 2.4), cardiogenic shock (OR 3.7, 95% CI 2.8 to 4.9), and death (OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.9 to 3.0) than patients without AF. Development of AF during hospitalization for AMI was associated with higher rates of readmission within 30 days after discharge (21.7% vs 16.0%), but no significant difference was noted in early postdischarge 30-day all-cause mortality rates (8.3% vs 5.1%). In conclusion, new-onset AF after AMI is strongly related to in-hospital complications of AMI and higher short-term readmission rates.
Rights and Permissions
Citation: Am J Cardiol. 2016 Apr 15;117(8):1213-8. doi: 10.1016/j.amjcard.2016.01.012. Epub 2016 Jan 28. Link to article on publisher's site
Related Resources
Link to Article in PubMed
Keywords
  • UMCCTS funding
PubMed ID
26874548
Citation Information
Amartya Kundu, Kevin O'Day, Amir Y. Shaikh, Darleen M. Lessard, et al.. "Relation of Atrial Fibrillation in Acute Myocardial Infarction to In-Hospital Complications and Early Hospital Readmission" Vol. 117 Iss. 8 (2016) ISSN: 0002-9149 (Linking)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/jorge_yarzebski/106/