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Unpublished Paper
The Philosophical, Ethical, and Legal Challenges toward Biopolitics on the Commercializing Human Body Parts
ExpressO (2015)
  • Jongho Kim
Abstract

Medical science has progressed to the point where doctors will soon be able to transplant any human organ. This advancement will have the potential to change attitudes toward human life and the human body – human life can be revitalized and the human body commercialized. Paradoxically, distinguishing between life and death has become harder in a high-tech medical society than it was in primitive society. We now say that the line between death and life should be drawn according to scientific criteria. Death is no longer a natural phenomenon; for modern human beings, it is now no more than an artificial manipulation. The definition of death has been manipulated by the market’s need for body parts. The market has become a powerful regulator and strongly affects how we think. For instance, novel ideas about goods now almost always revolve around whether the goods can be commercialized and/or industrialized. This market philosophy is justifying everything that can be done in post-modern high-tech society. In this article, I attempt to describe the problems of the organ trade, and to analyze them from a philosophical perspective; however, I did not jump to any conclusions. Instead, I remained open. I merely ask an important question: “To whom does my body belong? Who decides my rights?”

Keywords
  • Biopolitics,
  • Human body,
  • Ownership,
  • Organ transfer,
  • Property
Disciplines
Publication Date
March 16, 2015
Citation Information
Jongho Kim. "The Philosophical, Ethical, and Legal Challenges toward Biopolitics on the Commercializing Human Body Parts" ExpressO (2015)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/jongho_kim/1/