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Article
Sericulture, Silk and South Union Shakers
The Shaker Messenger, Volume XV, Number 1, 1993, pp. 5-9, 30
  • Donna C. Parker, Western Kentucky University
  • Jonathan J. Jeffrey, Western Kentucky University
Publication Date
1-1-1993
Comments

Originally published in The Shaker Messenger, Volume XV, Number 1, 1993, pp. 5-9, 30. The Shaker Messenger, published by The World of Shaker, is no longer in print. Photographs used with permission of the Shaker Museum at South Union.

Abstract
Kentucky Shakers were particularly adept at the process of producing silk. Kentucky's temperate climate was conducive to mulberry tree cultivation and sericulture, the raising of silkworms. South Union Sisters hatched and grew silkworms to harvest the delicate silk fibers they used in the manufacture of kerchiefs, neckwear, hat bands, bonnets, and sewing silk. Occasionally entire garments such as dresses were made from the luxurious silk.
Citation Information
Donna C. Parker and Jonathan J. Jeffrey. "Sericulture, Silk and South Union Shakers" The Shaker Messenger, Volume XV, Number 1, 1993, pp. 5-9, 30 Vol. 15 Iss. 1 (1993) p. 5 - 9, 30
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/jonathan_jeffrey/10/