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Ethically ambiguous negotiation tactics (EANTs): What are the rules behind the rules?
Law Society of Saskatchewan, CPD Seminar: Ethical Negotiations
  • John Wade, Bond University
Date of this Version
5-14-2014
Document Type
Conference Proceeding
Publication Details

Submitted version

Wade, J. (2014). Ethically ambiguous negotiation tactics (EANTs): What are the rules behind the rules? Paper presented at the Law Society of Saskatchewan, CPD Seminar: Ethical Negotiations. 14 May, 2014. Saskatchewan, Canada.

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© Copyright John Wade, 2014

Disciplines
Abstract

This paper will briefly discuss the following:

• A catalogue of the EANTs in use in negotiation and litigation.

• How common are these behaviours amongst lawyers?

• What are the attempted controls (or not) of these EANTs in different cultures?---market isolation, law, and “ethics”?

• Focussing on attempted ethical controls, what are the five (often overlapping) historic schools of “ethics”?

• Which school of “ethics” do various written codes of law societies predominantly reflect? –answer: pragmatism and self interest.

• If the epidemic of EANTs needs to be reduced, should pragmatism and self interest be taught and modelled more expressly to and by lawyers?

Citation Information
John Wade. "Ethically ambiguous negotiation tactics (EANTs): What are the rules behind the rules?" Law Society of Saskatchewan, CPD Seminar: Ethical Negotiations (2014)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/john_wade/78/