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Article
“Once I Would Have Gone Back … But Not Any Longer”: Nostalgia and Narrative Ethics in Wide Sargasso Sea
Critique: Studies in Contemporary Fiction
  • John Su, Marquette University
Document Type
Article
Language
eng
Format of Original
18 p.
Publication Date
1-1-2003
Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Original Item ID
doi: 10.1080/00111610309599943
Abstract
[Bertha is] necessary to the plot, but always she shrieks, howls, laughs horribly, attacks all and sundry—offstage. For me (and for you I hope) she must be right on stage. (Jean Rhys, Letters 156) We need, therefore, a kind of parallel history of, let us say, victimisation, which would counter the history of success and victory. To memorize the victims of history—the sufferers, the humiliated, the forgotten—should be a task for all of us at the end of this century. (Paul Ricoeur, “Memory and Forgetting” 10-11)
Comments

Critique: Studies in Contemporary Fiction, Vol. 44, No. 2 (2003): 157-174. DOI.

Citation Information
John Su. "“Once I Would Have Gone Back … But Not Any Longer”: Nostalgia and Narrative Ethics in Wide Sargasso Sea" Critique: Studies in Contemporary Fiction (2003) ISSN: 0011-1619
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/john_su/11/