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Article
Aping Political Science: Thoughts on Animal Experimentation and the Enslavement of Nature
American Journal of Bioethics (2009)
  • John Lunstroth
Abstract
If current reports of science are true that many, if not all, living things have sentience to greater or lesser degree, then science has recognized a definition of nature that no longer supports the assertion of unilateral authority by science over non-human living things because sentience implies essence and some degree of self-control towards the species’ specific ends. Science cannot both say nature is morally inert and that nature is sentient. Since the identity of science is based on, and animal research is justified only in, the older res nullius version of nature, then at the very least the life sciences have to undertake a radical self-evaluation to redefine themselves, since they cannot exist in the same way in relation to nature that the science of inanimate things does. All living things have the right, by virtue of their sentience, to be represented politically.
Keywords
  • animal rights; law and nature; science
Publication Date
May 1, 2009
Citation Information
John Lunstroth. "Aping Political Science: Thoughts on Animal Experimentation and the Enslavement of Nature" American Journal of Bioethics Vol. 9 Iss. 5 (2009)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/john_lunstroth/7/