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Retaking Ability Tests in a Selection Setting: Implications for Practice Effects, Training Performance, and Turnover
Articles and Chapters
  • John Hausknecht, Cornell University
Publication Date
1-1-2002
Abstract
This field study investigated the effect of retaking identical selection tests on subsequent test scores of 4,726 candidates for law enforcement positions. For both cognitive ability and oral communication ability selection tests, candidates produced significant score increases between the 1st and 2nd and the 2nd and 3rd test administrations. Furthermore, the repeat testing relationships with posthire training performance and turnover were examined in a sample of 1,515 candidates eventually selected into the organization. As predicted from persistence and continuance commitment rationales, the number of tests necessary to gain entry into the organization was positively associated with training performance and negatively associated with turnover probability.
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Required Publisher Statement
© American Psychological Association. Final version published as: Hausknecht, J. P., Trevor, C. O., & Farr, J. L. (2002). Retaking ability tests in a selection setting: Implications for practice effects, training performance, and turnover [Electronic version]. Journal of Applied Psychology, 87(2), 243-254.
doi: 10.1037//0021-9010.87.2.243
Reprinted with permission. All rights reserved.

Suggested Citation
Hausknecht, J. P., Trevor, C. O., & Farr, J. L. (2002). Retaking ability tests in a selection setting: Implications for practice effects, training performance, and turnover [Electronic version]. Retrieved [insert date], from Cornell University, ILR School site: http://digitalcommons.ilr.cornell.edu/articles/1170

Citation Information
John Hausknecht. "Retaking Ability Tests in a Selection Setting: Implications for Practice Effects, Training Performance, and Turnover" (2002)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/john_hausknecht/11/