Skip to main content
Article
The bystander approach to sexual assault risk reduction: Effects on risk recognition, perceived self-efficacy, and protective behavior.
Violence and Victims (2017)
  • Robert S Bannon, Johns Hopkins University
  • John D. Foubert
Abstract
Several characteristics of sexual assault awareness programs for women are associated with meeting the goals of risk reduction. To date, the literature lacks an exploration of how single-sex programs affect women, particularly when they take a bystander intervention focus using women's risk recognition and avoidance as outcome measures. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of The Women's Program (Foubert, 2011), a sexual assault awareness program geared toward women. Participants consisted of 103 undergraduate women attending a large, public university in the Midwest United States. Women in the treatment group viewed a presentation of The Women's Program, whereas the control group received no intervention. Consistent with hypotheses, program participants reported a greater ability to recognize risk cues, a greater willingness to engage in self-protective behaviors, and a greater level of perceived self-efficacy in handling threatening dating situations compared to the control group.
Keywords
  • sexual assault,
  • rape,
  • prevention,
  • risk reduction,
  • bystander intervention,
  • bystander effect,
  • the women's program,
  • self efficacy
Publication Date
January, 2017
Citation Information
Robert S Bannon and John D. Foubert. "The bystander approach to sexual assault risk reduction: Effects on risk recognition, perceived self-efficacy, and protective behavior." Violence and Victims Vol. 32 Iss. 1 (2017) p. 46 - 59
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/john_foubert/66/
Creative Commons license
Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons CC_BY International License.