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Article
Effects of two versions of an empathy-based rape prevention program on fraternity men’s rape survivor empathy, rape myth acceptance, likelihood of raping, and likelihood of committing sexual assault.
Journal of College Student Development (2006)
  • John D. Foubert, Oklahoma State University
  • J. T. Newberry, College of William and Mary
Abstract
Fraternity men (N = 261) at a small to midsized public university saw one of two versions of a rape prevention program or were in a control group. Program participants reported significant increases in empathy toward rape survivors and significant declines in rape myth acceptance, likelihood of raping, and likelihood of committing sexual assault. Program participants’ scores significantly differed from an untreated control group in several areas. Implications for describing a male-on-male rape to increase men’s empathy toward female survivors and other related attitudes are discussed.
Keywords
  • Rape Prevention,
  • Sexual Assault,
  • Empathy,
  • Likelihood of Raping,
  • Program,
  • rape myth,
  • survivor empathy
Publication Date
2006
Citation Information
John D. Foubert and J. T. Newberry. "Effects of two versions of an empathy-based rape prevention program on fraternity men’s rape survivor empathy, rape myth acceptance, likelihood of raping, and likelihood of committing sexual assault." Journal of College Student Development Iss. 47 (2006)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/john_foubert/23/