Skip to main content
Presentation
Using Perceptual Boundaries to Control Braking Actions
Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting
  • Brian P. McKenna
  • A. Bennett
  • John M. Flach, Wright State University - Main Campus
Document Type
Conference Proceeding
Publication Date
9-1-2004
Abstract

Flach, Smith, Dittman, & Stanard's (2003) hypothesis that a linear weighting of optical angle and expansion rate are used as a criterion for braking is evaluated in a simple driving task. The task required participants to drive from an initial stationary position to a full stop at a comfortable distance in front of a stationary obstacle. The simulated vehicle was controlled with an accelerator and a brake. Acceleration and deceleration were proportional to displacement of these controls. Results showed that people's critical actions (releasing the accelerator and initiating the brake) corresponded with a Tau criterion (constant ratio of angle and expansion rate). Time histories suggest that people were adopting non-proportional, discrete control strategies that approached time optimal, bang-bang control.

Comments

Presented at the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society's 48th Annual Meeting, New Orleans, LA, September 20-24, 2004.

DOI
10.1177/154193120404801920
Citation Information
Brian P. McKenna, A. Bennett and John M. Flach. "Using Perceptual Boundaries to Control Braking Actions" Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting Vol. 48 Iss. 19 (2004) p. 2300 - 2303
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/john_flach/48/