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No TitleWhat Concealed-Carry Gun Laws Mean for Individual Freedom and Public Safety
(2016)
  • John J. Donohue
Abstract
Twenty years ago, carrying a concealed weapon in public was strictly controlled or illegal in nearly half of U.S. states. Fewer than five million Americans had a concealed-carry permit. Today, carrying a concealed firearm is legal in all fifty states. And the number of permit holders has risen to nearly 13 million Americans. Most of these cite self-defense as the primary reason for carrying a gun outside the home. But critics of these laws say the latest research shows no clear connection between carrying a gun and preventing violence. Diane and guests discuss the rise of concealed-carry gun laws in the states and what it means for individual freedom and public safety.
Guests
  • Evan Osnos staff writer, The New Yorker magazine; author of "Making a Killing: The Business and Politics of Selling Guns" (The New Yorker, June 27, 2016)
  • John Donohue professor, Stanford Law School
  • Tim Schmidt president and founder, U.S. Concealed Carry Association; publisher of Concealed Carry Magazine
Antonia Okafor southwest director, Students for Concealed-Carry
Disciplines
Publication Date
August 18, 2016
Citation Information
John J. Donohue. "No TitleWhat Concealed-Carry Gun Laws Mean for Individual Freedom and Public Safety" (2016)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/john_donohue/154/