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Advancements in the Measurement of the Cryosphere Using Geophysics — Introduction
Geophysics
  • Andrew D. Parsekian, University of Wyoming
  • John Bradford, Boise State University
  • Georgios Tsoflias, University of Kansas
  • Steven Arcone, USACE Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory
  • Bernd Kulessa, Swansea University
Document Type
Article
Publication Date
1-1-2016
Abstract
Frozen regions of the earth are known as the cryosphere. The arctic, Antarctica, permafrost, ice sheets, and glaciers are some of the most challenging places to measure subsurface parameters, but they can also be some of the most important places to science and engineering research due to their susceptibility to environmental change. Ground-based, airborne, and space-borne geophysical methods are deployed to observe targets below the ground or in ice that may be difficult or impossible to measure using conventional direct observations and measurements. The papers in this special section address recent advances in instrumentation development and deployment and computational capabilities that have advanced cryosphere geophysical sciences. As such, many of these papers discuss the science that the methodology has helped reveal.
Copyright Statement

This document was originally published in Geophysics by Society of Exploration Geophysicists. Copyright restrictions may apply. doi: 10.1190/2015-1120-SPSEINTRO.1

Citation Information
Andrew D. Parsekian, John Bradford, Georgios Tsoflias, Steven Arcone, et al.. "Advancements in the Measurement of the Cryosphere Using Geophysics — Introduction" Geophysics (2016)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/john_bradford/69/