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Using High Stakes Tests to Raise Achievement
Articles and Chapters
  • John H. Bishop, Cornell University
Publication Date
4-1-2001
Abstract

“Educational reformers and most of the American public think that teachers ask too little of their pupils. These low expectations, they believe, result in watered-down curricula and a tolerance of mediocre teaching and inappropriate student behavior. The prophecy of low achievement thus becomes self-fulfilling.”

Comments

Suggested Citation
Bishop, J. (2001). Using high stakes tests to raise achievement [Electronic version]. Students continually learning: A report of presentations, student voices, and state actions (pp. 73-80). Washington, DC: Council of Chief State School Officers.
http://digitalcommons.ilr.cornell.edu/articles/21

Required Publisher Statement
Originally published as: Bishop, J. "Using High Stakes to Raise Achievement." Students Continually Learning. (Washington, DC: Council of Chief State School Officers, 2001), 73-80. Published version posted with special permission of the copyright holder.

Citation Information
John H. Bishop. "Using High Stakes Tests to Raise Achievement" (2001)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/john_bishop/32/