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Using History-Based Trade Books as Catalysts for Historical Writing, Speaking, and Listening in Elementary Curricula
The Councilor: A Journal of the Social Studies (2015)
  • John H. Bickford, III, Eastern Illinois University
  • Dylan Dilley, Eastern Illinois University
  • Valerie Metz, Eastern Illinois University
Abstract

State and national initiatives have aligned to compel change in elementary classroom curricula and instructional practice (Council of Chief State School Officers [CCSSO], 2012; National Governors Association Center for Best Practices & Council of Chief State School Officers [NGA & CCSSO], 2010; Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers [PARCC], 2012). An increased focus on informational texts and content area literacy are two significant changes intended to both facilitate and integrate historical thinking and historical content. For a subject that has struggled to maintain relevancy in elementary curricula, the social studies has a new, stronger position (Center on Education Policy, 2008; Fallace, Biscoe, & Perry, 2007; Holloway & Chiodo, 2009; National Council for the Social Studies [NCSS], 2010, 2013; Wilton & Bickford, 2012). Scholarship on both the cognition behind, and practical applications of, historical thinking directs teachers of adolescent students and elementary children (Bickford, 2013b; Nokes, 2011; Wineburg, 2001) yet historical thinking cannot emerge without solid curricular resources.

Keywords
  • elementary trade books,
  • history-based trade books,
  • elementary curricula
Publication Date
2015
Citation Information
John H. Bickford, Dylan Dilley and Valerie Metz. "Using History-Based Trade Books as Catalysts for Historical Writing, Speaking, and Listening in Elementary Curricula" The Councilor: A Journal of the Social Studies Vol. 76 Iss. 1 (2015)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/john_bickford/19/