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Article
Tea Parties, Whigs, and Compromise: The Historical Roots of U.S. Government-Business Relations
International Journal of Organizational Theory and Behavior
  • John R. Bartle, University of Nebraska at Omaha
Document Type
Article
Publication Date
10-1-2010
Abstract
This article reviews the politics of government-business relations in the US from 1776 to the present. It argues that two major political interests, the agrarian democrats and the nationalist Whigs, created the context for discussion of economic policy that continues today. At times, pragmatic compromises have resolved the differences between these interests. The lessons from this history are instructive for today, and suggest potentially viable policies and coalitions to address business issues.
Citation Information
John R. Bartle. "Tea Parties, Whigs, and Compromise: The Historical Roots of U.S. Government-Business Relations" International Journal of Organizational Theory and Behavior Vol. 13 Iss. 3 (2010) p. 342 - 353
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/john_bartle/15/