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Teaching Appropriate Social Behaviors to a Young Man with Moderate Mental Retardation in a Supported Competitive Employment Setting
Education and Training in Mental Retardation (1988)
  • John J. Wheeler, Southern Illinois University Carbondale
  • Paul Bates, Southern Illinois University Carbondale
  • Kathleen J. Marshall, University of South Carolina
  • Sidney R. Miller, Southern Illinois University Carbondale
Abstract
This study validated the efficacy of the supported employment model in maintaining the employment of a young man with Down Syndrome identified as moderately mentally retarded. In this study, social skills training and self-monitoring were used to remediate socially inappropriate behaviors which were jeopardizing his continued employment. Results of this investigation indicate that appropriate social behaviors were improved and maintained over the 38-week period with the level of trainer support also being systematically faded over time. The conclusions of this study provide guidelines for on-the-job training and follow-up procedures which have been found to be necessary in assisting persons with moderate and severe disabilities to function effectively in meaningful employment settings.
Keywords
  • employment,
  • intellectual disability,
  • vocational education,
  • disabilities,
  • special education,
  • Employment statistics,
  • social behavior,
  • disabled persons,
  • mental training,
  • training devices
Publication Date
June 1, 1988
Citation Information
John J. Wheeler, Paul Bates, Kathleen J. Marshall and Sidney R. Miller. "Teaching Appropriate Social Behaviors to a Young Man with Moderate Mental Retardation in a Supported Competitive Employment Setting" Education and Training in Mental Retardation Vol. 23 Iss. 2 (1988) p. 105 - 116 ISSN: 1042-9859
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/john-wheeler/39/