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Intrusiveness of Behavioral Treatments for Children with Autism and Developmental Disabilities: An Initial Investigation
Education and Training in Autism and Developmental Disabilities
  • Michael R. Mayton, West Virginia University
  • Stacy L. Carter, Texas Tech University
  • Jie Zhang, SUNY Brockport Zhang
  • John J. Wheeler, East Tennessee State University
Document Type
Article
Publication Date
1-1-2014
Description

The behaviors frequently displayed by students with autism can place them at risk for overly reactive behavior interventions with unwanted side effects. The current study examined the level of intrusiveness of behavioral treatments developed for 198 students with disabilities from 13 different states. Results demonstrated that students diagnosed with autism had proportionally more intrusive behavior interventions when compared to students in five other disability categories and indicated that many students with autism were unnecessarily subjected to highly intrusive behavior interventions. The implications of these findings are discussed, and recommendations for future research are provided.

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Copyright Statement

This document was published with permission by the publisher. It was originally published by the Education and Training in Autism and Developmental Disabilities.

Citation Information
Michael R. Mayton, Stacy L. Carter, Jie Zhang and John J. Wheeler. "Intrusiveness of Behavioral Treatments for Children with Autism and Developmental Disabilities: An Initial Investigation" Education and Training in Autism and Developmental Disabilities Vol. 49 Iss. 1 (2014) p. 92 - 101 ISSN: 2154-1647
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/john-wheeler/10/