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Article
Factors associated with non-attendance in a general practice super clinic population in regional Australia: a retrospective cohort study
Australasian Medical Journal
  • Susan Nancarrow, Southern Cross University
  • Joanne Bradbury, Southern Cross University
  • Catharine Avila, Southern Cross University
Document Type
Article
Publication Date
1-1-2014
Peer Reviewed
Peer-Reviewed
Abstract
Background: Non-attendance at medical appointments is associated with increased patient morbidity and is a significant drain on health service resources. Australian studies have focused on secondary healthcare settings, screening, and interventions to reduce non-attendance. Aims: To explore factors associated with non-attendance in a regional primary care setting. Method: A retrospective cohort of all patients with a scheduled appointment between October 2011 and October 2013 at a regional, primary care clinic providing medical and allied health services in a region of New South Wales (NSW) serving a large Aboriginal population (10.7 per cent). Using multivariate logistic regression, non-attendance was regressed on a range of covariates, including number of appointments per person, gender and ethnicity, and day of the week. Results: The overall proportion of missed appointments was 7.6 per cent. Risk factors for non-attendance were day of the week [Mondays (8.1 per cent), Fridays (8.0 per cent), and Thursdays (7.9 per cent), (χ2(4)= 20.208, p
Citation Information

Nancarrow, S, Bradbury, J & Avila, C 2014, 'Factors associated with non-attendance in a general practice super clinic population in regional Australia: a retrospective cohort study', Australasian Medical Journal, vol. 7, no. 8, pp. 323-333.

Article available on Open Access