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Contribution to Book
’Love you’ doesn’t mean ‘I love you’: Just a way to say goodbye. The nature of leave-taking and its pragmatic applications in Mandarin Chinese
Selected Papers from Pragmatics in the CJK Classroom: The State of the Art (2007)
  • Jinhuei Enya Dai, Monterey Institute of International Studies
Abstract
A common component of conducting a leave-taking event among American family members over the telephone involves a social ritual to close conversation. Such a ritual includes an optional "love you" which utilizes the close proximity, in terms of family relationship, to politely close a conversation over the phone. "Love you" in this context, as a consequence, doesn't mean "I love you", but prompts a way to bid farewell. In Mandarin Chinese, the parallel function of prompting leave-taking is also manifested in 下次有空再聊xiàcì yǒukòng zàiliáo (Chat with you next time.). I approach the speech event of leave-taking in Mandarin Chinese by exploring its pragmatic imperative (Yoshimi, 2005), nature, and social ritual pattern. I follow Kinnison's (2000) classification built upon linguistic routines used by American and Chinese guests at leave-taking after dinner. Additionally, I further point out elements and strategies involved in a leave-taking event employed in different situations in Mandarin Chinese, e.g., telephone conversation, street encounters, and peer-gathering. Moreover, I construct a pragmatics-focused pedagogical model that embodies forms of attention getters, apology forms, time-relevant excuses, concern for the host/interlocutor's welfare, and repairs. Application of this model to the instruction of leave-taking in a CFL classroom will be provided to demonstrate the relation of language use and pragmatic function.
Publication Date
2007
Editor
Dina R. Yoshimi and Haidan Wang
Publisher
National Language Resource Center Proceeding Publications
Citation Information
Jinhuei Enya Dai. "’Love you’ doesn’t mean ‘I love you’: Just a way to say goodbye. The nature of leave-taking and its pragmatic applications in Mandarin Chinese" MānoaSelected Papers from Pragmatics in the CJK Classroom: The State of the Art (2007)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/jinhuei_dai/3/