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Article
The Evolution of Chinese Nonproliferation Policy since the end of the Cold War: Progress, Problems and Prospects
Journal of Contemporary China (2002)
  • Jing-Dong Yuan, Monterey Institute of International Studies
Abstract

This article offers an overview of China's evolving nonproliferation policy over the past decade. It documents the key developments during this period and identifies both the internal and external factors that have brought about significant change in Chinese policy. It argues that China's growing recognition of the threats posed by WMD proliferation, image concerns, its interest in maintaining stable Sino–US relations, and the US policy initiatives aimed at influencing Chinese behavior are largely accountable for Beijing's gradual acceptance of nonproliferation norms, pledges to adhere to selected multilateral export control guidelines, and the introduction of domestic export control regulations. It suggests that the future direction of China's nonproliferation policy to a large extent will depend on how Beijing and Washington manage their increasing differences over missile defenses and the Taiwan issue.

Publication Date
May, 2002
Citation Information
Jing-Dong Yuan. "The Evolution of Chinese Nonproliferation Policy since the end of the Cold War: Progress, Problems and Prospects" Journal of Contemporary China Vol. 11 Iss. 31 (2002)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/jing_dong_yuan/48/