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Article
Survey of Three Primate Species in Forest Fragments at La Suerte Field Station, Costa Rica
Neotropical Primates (2002)
  • Jill D. Pruetz, Miami University - Oxford
  • Heather C. Leasor, California State University, Fullerton
Abstract
As habitat destruction continues to threaten the existence of tropical species, it becomes increasingly important to document their numbers as a means of assessing their survival potential. Surveys are a method commonly used to document the status of species such as primates and often serve as a preliminary step to long-term studies of primate populations. Reports of non-human primate surveys are common in the literature (for example, Agoramoorthy and Lohmann, 1999; Cant, 1978; Gonzalez-Kirchner, 1996, 1999; Hashimoto, 1995; Johnson and Overdorff, 1999; Plumptre and Reynolds, 1996; Thomas, 1991; Whitesides et al., 1988; Yamagiwa et al., 1992). However, Peres (1999a) points out the lack of consistency in many studies and makes suggestions for standardizing techniques as a way to ensure the reliability of primate surveys between sites. Many of Peres’ (1999a) guidelines were adopted in our study (See ‘Methods’).
Publication Date
April, 2002
Publisher Statement
Copyright 2002 IUCN/SSC Primate Specialist Group
Citation Information
Jill D. Pruetz and Heather C. Leasor. "Survey of Three Primate Species in Forest Fragments at La Suerte Field Station, Costa Rica" Neotropical Primates Vol. 10 Iss. 1 (2002) p. 4 - 9
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/jill-pruetz/18/