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Culturally adaptive storytelling intervention versus didactic intervention to improve hypertension control in Vietnam: a cluster-randomized controlled feasibility trial
Open Access Articles
  • Hoa L. Nguyen, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Jeroan J. Allison, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Duc A. Ha, Ministry of Health
  • German Chiriboga, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Ha N. Ly, Institute of Population, Health and Development
  • Hanh T. Tran, Hanoi School of Public Health
  • Cuong K. Nguyen, Institute of Population, Health and Development
  • Diem M. Dang, Hanoi School of Public Health
  • Ngoc T. Phan, Institute of Population, Health and Development
  • Nguyen C. Vu, Institute of Population, Health and Development
  • Quang P. Nguyen, Bates College
  • Robert J. Goldberg, University of Massachusetts Medical School
UMMS Affiliation
Department of Quantitative Health Sciences
Publication Date
5-1-2017
Document Type
Article
Abstract

BACKGROUND: Vietnam is experiencing an epidemiologic transition with an increased prevalence of non-communicable diseases. Novel, large-scale, effective, and sustainable interventions to control hypertension in Vietnam are needed. We report the results of a cluster-randomized feasibility trial at 3 months follow-up conducted in Hung Yen province, Vietnam, designed to evaluate the feasibility and acceptability of two community-based interventions to improve hypertension control: a "storytelling" intervention, "We Talk about Our Hypertension," and a didactic intervention.

METHODS: The storytelling intervention included stories about strategies for coping with hypertension, with patients speaking in their own words, and didactic content about the importance of healthy lifestyle behaviors including salt reduction and exercise. The didactic intervention included only didactic content. The storytelling intervention was delivered by two DVDs at 3-month intervals; the didactic intervention included only one installment. The trial was conducted in four communes, equally randomized to the two interventions.

RESULTS: The mean age of the 160 study patients was 66 years, and 54% were men. Most participants described both interventions as understandable, informative, and motivational. Between baseline and 3 months, mean systolic blood pressure declined by 8.2 mmHg (95% CI 4.1-12.2) in the storytelling group and by 5.5 mmHg (95% CI 1.4-9.5) in the didactic group. The storytelling group also reported a significant increase in hypertension medication adherence.

CONCLUSIONS: Both interventions were well accepted in several rural communities and were shown to be potentially effective in lowering blood pressure. A large-scale randomized trial is needed to compare the effectiveness of the two interventions in controlling hypertension.

TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT02483780.

Keywords
  • Blood pressure,
  • Hypertension,
  • Storytelling,
  • Trial,
  • Vietnam
Rights and Permissions
Copyright © The Author(s). 2017.
DOI of Published Version
10.1186/s40814-017-0136-9
Source
Pilot Feasibility Stud. 2017 May 1;3:22. eCollection 2017. Link to article on publisher's site
Related Resources
Link to Article in PubMed
PubMed ID
28473924
Creative Commons License
Creative Commons Attribution 4.0
Citation Information
Hoa L. Nguyen, Jeroan J. Allison, Duc A. Ha, German Chiriboga, et al.. "Culturally adaptive storytelling intervention versus didactic intervention to improve hypertension control in Vietnam: a cluster-randomized controlled feasibility trial" Vol. 3 (2017) ISSN: 2055-5784 (Linking)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/jeroan_allison/260/