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Article
Depression and anxiety among high-risk obstetric inpatients
Systems and Psychosocial Advances Research Center Publications and Presentations
  • Nancy Byatt, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Katherine Hicks-Courant, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Autumn Davidson, University of Chicago
  • Ruth Levesque, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Eric O. Mick, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Jeroan J. Allison, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Tiffany A. Moore Simas, University of Massachusetts Medical School
UMMS Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry; Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology; Department of Quantitative Health Sciences
Date
11-1-2014
Document Type
Article
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To assess the following among women hospitalized antenatally due to high-risk pregnancies: (1) rates of depression symptoms and anxiety symptoms, (2) changes in depression symptoms and anxiety symptoms and, (3) rates of mental health treatment. METHODS: Sixty-two participants hospitalized for high-risk obstetrical complications completed the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS), Generalized Anxiety Disorder 7-item scale (GAD-7) and Short-Form 12 weekly until delivery or discharge, and once postpartum. RESULTS: Average length of total hospital stay was 8.3 +/- 7.6 days for women who completed an initial admission survey (n = 62) and 16.3 +/- 8.9 (n = 34), 25.4 +/- 10.2 (n = 17) and 35 +/- 10.9 days (n = 9) for those who completed 2, 3 and 4 surveys, respectively. EPDS was > /= 10 in 27% (n=17) and GAD-7 was > /= 10 in 13% (n = 8) of participants at initial survey. Mean anxiety (4.2 +/- 6.5 vs. 5.2 +/- 5.1, p = .011) and depression (4.4 +/- 5.6 vs. 6.9 +/- 4.8, p = .011) scores were lower postpartum compared to initial survey. Past mental health diagnosis predicted depression symptoms [odds ratio (OR) = 4.54; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.91-7.17] and anxiety symptoms (OR = 5.95; 95% CI 3.04-8.86) at initial survey; however, 21% (n = 10) with no diagnostic history had EPDS > /= 10. Five percent (n = 3) received mental health treatment during pregnancy. CONCLUSION: Hospitalized high-risk obstetrical patients may commonly experience depression symptoms and/or anxiety symptoms and not receive treatment. A history of mental health treatment or diagnosis was associated with depression symptoms or anxiety symptoms in pregnancy. Of women with an EPDS > /= 10, > 50% did not report a past mental health diagnosis.
Rights and Permissions
Citation: Gen Hosp Psychiatry. 2014 Nov-Dec;36(6):644-9. doi: 10.1016/j.genhosppsych.2014.07.011. Epub 2014 Jul 27. Link to article on publisher's site
Related Resources
Link to Article in PubMed
Keywords
  • UMCCTS funding
PubMed ID
25149040
Citation Information
Nancy Byatt, Katherine Hicks-Courant, Autumn Davidson, Ruth Levesque, et al.. "Depression and anxiety among high-risk obstetric inpatients" Vol. 36 Iss. 6 (2014) ISSN: 0163-8343 (Linking)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/jeroan_allison/211/