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Welcome to McDonalds, How May I Exploit You? Fast food’s corporate social responsibility to lower-income areas
(2011)
  • Jennifer T.R. Tomlinson, Rollins College
Abstract

Despite the admiral design and effectiveness of the fast-food business model, it also creates a dilemma between economic prosperity and the social influence of the fast food phenomena, particularly in lower-income areas. Research indicates that demands are dictated by what is available to one’s environment and the social conditions in which one lives. Therefore, the continual marketing and supply of fast food to lower-income areas where people are limited to different food options is a type of exploitation. To alleviate some of the problems associated with fast-food culture, fast-food corporations should consult with community leaders, community members and healthcare officials to develop solutions to do “good.” The “good” in this sense would be to provide healthier foods options in urban areas where socio-economic limitations and restrictions prevent people from accessing healthier foods options. The initiative for fast-food corporations to do this type of “good” would help areas with dietary limitations and also result in better perceptions of fast-food corporations, which, in turn, could be used for stronger marketing campaigns to elicit sales.

Keywords
  • Fast Food,
  • Industry,
  • Corporations,
  • Exploitation,
  • Exploit,
  • Business,
  • Ethics,
  • Social,
  • Implications,
  • Corporate,
  • Social,
  • Responsibility,
  • Lower,
  • Income,
  • Areas,
  • Urban,
  • Ethnic,
  • Diverse,
  • McDonalds,
  • Marketing,
  • Rituals,
  • Social Institutions,
  • Customs,
  • Status,
  • Practices
Publication Date
Fall October, 2011
Citation Information
Jennifer T.R. Tomlinson. "Welcome to McDonalds, How May I Exploit You? Fast food’s corporate social responsibility to lower-income areas" (2011)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/jennifertomlinson/2/