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Article
Shifts in Attitudes toward Coyotes on the Urbanized East Coast: The Cape Cod Experience, 2005-2012
Human Dimensions of Wildlife: An International Journal (2015)
  • Jennifer Jackman, Professor, Salem State College
  • Allen Rutberg
Abstract
The migration of coyotes to northeastern United States since the mid-twentieth century has increased human-coyote interactions. This article offers insights into the evolution of attitudes toward Eastern coyotes by analyzing survey data from voters on Cape Cod, Massachusetts in 2005 and 2012. Responses were obtained in a region where familiarity and conflict with coyotes was high. The data supported growing acceptance of coyotes and increased opposition to lethal control. While previous research has found women to feel more negative toward and fearful of large carnivores, in this study gender differences in acceptance and fear of coyotes diminished with time. Greater opposition among women to lethal interventions persisted. Future studies should examine the gender and geographic dimensions of attitudinal change to more fully understand attitudes toward wildlife in urbanized environments.
Disciplines
Publication Date
2015
Citation Information
Jennifer Jackman and Allen Rutberg. "Shifts in Attitudes toward Coyotes on the Urbanized East Coast: The Cape Cod Experience, 2005-2012" Human Dimensions of Wildlife: An International Journal (2015)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/jennifer_jackman/2/