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Article
Are we having fun yet? Testing the effects of imagery use on the affective and enjoyment responses to acute moderate exercise
Psychology of Sport and Exercise (2010)
  • Damian M. Stanley, University of Birmingham
  • Jennifer Cumming, University of Birmingham
Abstract

Objectives The present study investigated whether using imagery during acute moderate exercise evokes more positive affective and enjoyment responses than exercising without an assigned strategy.

Design Laboratory experiment.

Methods Participants (N = 88, mean age = 19.81 years) were randomly allocated to 1 of 4 conditions (enjoyment imagery, energy imagery, technique imagery, or exercise alone). Affect was measured before, during, and after 20 min of moderate intensity (50% of Heart Rate Reserve) cycle ergometry. A single-item measure of enjoyment was developed for use during exercise.

Results Enjoyment and energy imagery brought about significant increases in valence from pre- to postexercise, and significantly higher valence during exercise than exercise alone. All 3 imagery groups reported significant increases in revitalization from pre- to postexercise, and higher enjoyment during exercise than exercise controls.

Conclusions The findings indicate that imagery use may enhance affective and enjoyment responses to exercise.

Keywords
  • Exercise,
  • imagery,
  • affect,
  • exercise psychology
Publication Date
2010
Citation Information
Damian M. Stanley and Jennifer Cumming. "Are we having fun yet? Testing the effects of imagery use on the affective and enjoyment responses to acute moderate exercise" Psychology of Sport and Exercise Vol. 11 (2010)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/jennifer_cumming/12/