Skip to main content
Article
Social Influence in Child Care Centers: A Test of the Theory of Normative Social Behavior
Health Communication
  • Maria Knight Lapinski, Michigan State University
  • Jenn Anderson, South Dakota State University
  • Alicia Shugart, Center for Diesease Control and Prevention
  • Ewen Todd
Document Type
Article
Publication Date
1-1-2014
Abstract

Child care centers are a unique context for studying communication about the social and personal expectations about health behaviors. The theory of normative social behavior (TNSB; Rimal & Real, 2005 ) provides a framework for testing the role of social and psychological influences on handwashing behaviors among child care workers. A cross-sectional survey of child careworkers in 21 centers indicates that outcome expectations and group identity increase the strength of the relationship between descriptive norms and handwashing behavior. Injunctive norms also moderate the effect of descriptive norms on handwashing behavior such that when strong injunctive norms are reported, descriptive norms are positively related to handwashing, but when weak injunctive norms are reported, descriptive norms are negatively related to handwashing. The findings suggest that communication interventions in child care centers can focus on strengthening injunctive norms in order to increase handwashing behaviors in child care centers. The findings also suggest that the theory of normative social behavior can be useful in organizational contexts.

DOI of Published Version
10.1080/10410236.2012.738322
Language
en
Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Rights
Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
Disciplines
Citation Information
Maria Knight Lapinski, Jenn Anderson, Alicia Shugart and Ewen Todd. "Social Influence in Child Care Centers: A Test of the Theory of Normative Social Behavior" Health Communication Vol. 29 Iss. 3 (2014) p. 219 - 232
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/jenn-anderson/12/