Skip to main content
Unpublished Paper
Internet Control or Internet Censorship? Comparing the Control Models of China, Singapore, and the United States to Guide Taiwan’s Choice
ExpressO (2013)
  • Jeffrey Li, Harvard Law School
Abstract
Internet censorship generally refers to unjustified online speech scrutiny and control by the government or government-approved measures for Internet control. The danger of Internet censorship is the chilling effect and the substantial harm on free speech, a cornerstone of democracy, in cyberspace. This paper compares China’s blocking and filtering system, the class license system of Singapore, and the government-private partnership model of the United States to identify the features, and pros and cons of each model on the international human rights. By finding lessons from each of the model, this paper suggests Taiwan should remain its current meager internet control model and remand flaws in its government and private partnership model adopted by the Copyright Act in accordance with the international human right standards.
Keywords
  • Internet censorship,
  • international human right,
  • free flow of information,
  • cyberspace
Publication Date
May 15, 2013
Citation Information
Jeffrey Li. "Internet Control or Internet Censorship? Comparing the Control Models of China, Singapore, and the United States to Guide Taiwan’s Choice" ExpressO (2013)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/jeffrey_li/1/