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Translational Research at Community Health Centers: Challenges and Successes in Recruiting and Retaining Low-Income Latino Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Into a Randomized Clinical Trial
Preventive and Behavioral Medicine Publications and Presentations
  • Milagros C. Rosal, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Mary Jo White, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Amy Borg, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Jeffrey Scavron, Baystate Brightwood Health Center
  • Lucy M. Candib, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Ira S. Ockene, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Robert P. Magner, University of Massachusetts Medical School
UMMS Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Division of Preventive and Behavioral Medicine; Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine; Department of Family Medicine and Community Health
Date
9-1-2010
Document Type
Article
Subjects
Community Health Centers; Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic; Patient Selection; Hispanic Americans; Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2; Translational Research
Abstract

PURPOSE: To describe methods used to recruit and retain low-income Latinos in a randomized clinical trial (RCT) of a diabetes self-management intervention at 5 community health centers (CHCs) in Massachusetts.

METHODS: Consent from primary care providers (PCPs) was obtained to screen their patients. Trained site research coordinators (SRCs) screened, recruited, and enrolled participants following a multistep process (medical record reviews, PCP approval, a patient eligibility interview) and provided support for retention efforts. Assessment staff were trained in motivational strategies to facilitate retention and received ongoing support from a retention coordinator. Electronic tracking systems facilitated recruitment and retention activities.

RESULTS: Of an initial pool of 1176 patients, 1034 were active at the time of screening, 592 (57%) were eligible by medical record review, and 487 received PCP approval (92% of reviewed patients). Of these, 293 patients completed the patient screening interview (60% of patients with PCP approval, and 76% of those reached), and 276 were eligible. Sixteen percent of all active patients refused participation, and 8% of contacted patients were unreachable. Two hundred fifty-two patients were randomized after completion of baseline assessments. Clinical, behavioral, and psychosocial assessment completion rates were 92%, 77%, and 86% at 12-month follow-up, respectively, and 93% of patients completed at least one study assessment at 12 months.

CONCLUSIONS: CHCs are a prime setting for translation research aimed to eliminate diabetes health disparities. Successful recruitment and retention efforts must address institutional/organizational, research team, and patient-related challenges.

Rights and Permissions
Citation: Diabetes Educ. 2010 Sep-Oct;36(5):733-49. Epub 2010 Aug 20.
Related Resources
Link to article in PubMed
PubMed ID
20729512
Citation Information
Milagros C. Rosal, Mary Jo White, Amy Borg, Jeffrey Scavron, et al.. "Translational Research at Community Health Centers: Challenges and Successes in Recruiting and Retaining Low-Income Latino Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Into a Randomized Clinical Trial" Vol. 36 Iss. 5 (2010)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/jeffrey-scavron/2/