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Article
Cognitive and Physiological Antecedents of Threat and Challenge Appraisal
Journal of Personality and Social Psychology
  • Joe Tomaka, University of Texas at El Paso
  • Jim Blascovich, University of California - Santa Barbara
  • Jeffery L. Kibler, Nova Southeastern University
  • John M. Ernst, Ohio State University
Document Type
Article
Publication Date
7-1-1997
Keywords
  • Blood Pressure,
  • Cognition,
  • Heart Rate,
  • Life Change Events,
  • Stress
Disciplines
Peer Reviewed
1
Abstract
Cognitive appraisal theories of stress and emotion propose that cognitive appraisals precede physiological responses, whereas peripheralist theories propose that physiological arousal precedes cognitive processes. Three studies examined this issue regarding threat and challenge responses to potential stress. Study 1 supported cognitive appraisal theory by demonstrating that threat and challenge cognitive appraisals and physiological responses could be elicited experimentally by manipulating instructional set. Studies 2 and 3, in contrast, found that manipulations of physiological response patterns consistent with challenge and threat did not result in corresponding changes in cognitive appraisal. Appraisals in Study 3, however, were related to subjective pain independent of the physiological manipulation. These studies suggest a central role for cognitive appraisal processes in elicitation of threat and challenge responses to potentially stressful situations.
DOI
10.1037/0022-3514.73.1.63
Citation Information
Joe Tomaka, Jim Blascovich, Jeffery L. Kibler and John M. Ernst. "Cognitive and Physiological Antecedents of Threat and Challenge Appraisal" Journal of Personality and Social Psychology Vol. 73 Iss. 1 (1997) p. 63 - 72 ISSN: 0022-3514
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/jeffrey-kibler/21/