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Motivating African-American Students Through Information Literacy Instruction: Exploring the Link Between Encouragement and Academic Self-Concept
The Reference Librarian (2009)
  • Jeffrey M Mortimore, Georgia Southern University
  • Nancy A Wall, Georgia Southern University
Abstract
This article argues that information literacy instruction has a unique role to play in increasing academic motivation among African-American college students. Drawing on recent work in student motivation, this article argues that perception of faculty encouragement is the single most important predictor of African-American college students' academic self-concept, trumping both academic performance (e.g., grades) and school environment (i.e., historically Black colleges or universities vs. predominantly White colleges or universities). Given this link between encouragement and academic self-concept, information literacy instruction becomes an arena in which librarians may support the development of students' self-concept, thus increasing motivation. This article discusses the role of encouragement in information literacy instruction and suggests how to achieve greater perception of encouragement both during and after instruction. Lastly, this article considers ramifications for instructional services programs at historically Black colleges or universities by reviewing recent experiences at Bennett College for Women in Greensboro, North Carolina.
Publication Date
2009
Citation Information
Jeffrey M Mortimore and Nancy A Wall. "Motivating African-American Students Through Information Literacy Instruction: Exploring the Link Between Encouragement and Academic Self-Concept" The Reference Librarian Vol. 50 Iss. 1 (2009)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/jeff_mortimore/7/