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Article
Decontamination and residual effects against pathogens from washing meat surfaces with 2% levulinic, acetic, and lactic acids
Meat Science
  • C. E. Carpenter
  • J. V. Smith
  • Jeffery R. Broadbent, Utah State University
Document Type
Article
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
1-1-2011
DOI
10.1016/j.meatsci.2010.12.032
Abstract
We compared spray washing at 55.4 °C with 2% levulinic acid to that with lactic or acetic acid for decontamination of pathogenic bacteria inoculated onto meat surfaces, and their residual protection against later growth of pathogenic bacteria. The model systems included Escherichia coli O157:H7 on beef plate, Salmonella on chicken skin and pork belly, and Listeria monocytogenes on turkey roll. In the decontamination studies, acid washes lowered recoverable numbers of pathogens by 0.6 to 1 log/cm2 as compared to no-wash controls, and only lactic acid lowered the number of pathogens recovered as compared to the water wash. Washing with levulinic acid at 68.3 or 76.7 °C did not result in additional decontamination of E. coli. Acetic acid prevented residual growth of E. coli and L. monocytogenes, and it reduced numbers of Salmonella on chicken skin to below recoverable levels. Overall, levulinic acid did not provide as effective decontamination as lactic acid nor residual protection as acetic acid.
Citation Information
Carpenter, C. E., J. V. Smith, and J. R. Broadbent. 2011. Decontamination and residual effects against pathogens from washing meat surfaces with 2% levulinic, acetic, and lactic acids. Meat Sci. 88:256-260.