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Walter Lippmann, the Indispensable Opposition
Trained Capacities: John Dewey, Rhetoric, and Democratic Practice
  • Jean Goodwin, Iowa State University
Document Type
Book Chapter
Publication Version
Published Version
Publication Date
1-1-2014
Abstract
Lippmann and Dewey both confronted the problem of how to get the nation’s highly successful science to have impact in the public sphere. Dewey’s solution to the problem is well known: an underspecified form of communication which would transform the Great Society beyond the understanding of any individual into the Great Community where policies could be wisely chosen. Lippmann was more uncompromisingly pessimistic, doubting the ability of anyone–including himself–to master the range of knowledge necessary to make fully informed decisions. Nevertheless, there is a legitimate role for even uninformed publics to participate in civic deliberations: they act as adjudicators of debates in which the contending experts demonstrate their reasonability.
Comments

This is a book chapter from Trained Capacities: John Dewey, Rhetoric, and Democratic Practice (2014): 142. Posted with permission.

Copyright Owner
University of South Carolina Press
Language
en
File Format
application/pdf
Citation Information
Jean Goodwin. "Walter Lippmann, the Indispensable Opposition" Trained Capacities: John Dewey, Rhetoric, and Democratic Practice (2014) p. 142 - 158
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/jeangoodwin/25/